Mosquitoes

What are mosquitoes?

Mosquitoes are parasitic pests. Female mosquitoes feed on the blood of animals and humans in order to produce viable eggs. All mosquitoes have a fly-like appearance. They have slender bodies, long legs, narrow wings, and an extended, tube-like mouthpart (proboscis) that they use for feeding. Most mosquitoes are black, dark brown, or black and white in color, but their exact color and color pattern is species-specific. Mosquitoes are found living worldwide, and due to their ability to spread dangerous disease, are considered to be some of the most deadly animals in the world.
a mosquito biting a persons neck in mesa arizona

Are mosquitoes dangerous?

Mosquitoes are most certainly dangerous pests. They feed on a wide range of hosts and are vectors of many diseases and parasites. In the United States, mosquitoes are responsible for transmitting West Nile virus, encephalitis, and the Zika virus. They are also responsible for infecting dogs with potentially fatal parasitic heartworms. In developing and tropical countries, mosquitoes spread diseases like malaria, yellow fever, and dengue fever, which incapacitate or kill millions of people each year.

Why do I have a mosquito problem?

Mosquitoes breed in standing water, and therefore, are attracted to properties with areas of standing water. Here are some areas that act as mosquito breeding grounds:

  • Ornamental ponds

  • Wading pools

  • Drainage ditches

  • Containers that collect water

  • Clogged gutters

  • Water on the tops of tarps

  • Trash can lids

Environmental conditions such as high rainfall and warm temperatures favor mosquito development and create large populations of mosquitoes that can become problematic on any property. Both females and males feed on plant nectar and pollen as their main food sources, so properties with a lot of flowering plants and trees on them can also attract mosquitoes.

Where will I find mosquitoes?

During the heat of the day, mosquitoes rest in tall grasses, in areas of dense vegetation, along fence lines, under trees, behind tree bark, or underneath decks and porches. Mosquitoes are most active at dusk and dawn, swarming around areas of standing water or flowering vegetation. Properties with ponds, marshes, swamps, wetlands, flower gardens, or flowering trees tend to have large populations of mosquitoes on them. Mosquitoes are mainly outdoor pests, but will make their way inside while searching for food sources. They find their way indoors through open windows and doors, holes in screens, and gaps around windows and doors.

How do I get rid of mosquitoes?

Partner with a trusted pest control expert to control mosquitoes. At All Clear Pest Control, we offer family-friendly and eco-friendly residential and commercial pest control services to quickly resolve your Arizona property’s pest problem. Our trained technicians provide the inspection, treatment, and preventative services needed to control mosquito populations. For a free estimate, or to learn more about our mosquito control services, reach out to us!

How can I prevent mosquitoes in the future?

Put into place the following preventative measures to minimize future issues with mosquitoes:

  • Maintain gutters.

  • Keep grass cut short and remove dense vegetation from your property.

  • Do not overplant flowering vegetation near your home.

  • Regularly remove water that collects on the tops of trash can lids, tarps and similar items.

  • Store buckets, wheelbarrows, baby pools, and other containers that collect water upside down when not in use.

  • Regularly empty and re-fill kiddie pools, bird baths, and your pet’s water dish.

  • Replace torn screens and place weather stripping around windows and doors.

 

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